“For what it’s worth: it’s never too late to be whoever you want to be. I hope you live a life you’re proud of, and if you find that you’re not, I hope you have the strength to start all over again.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald

There are two types of best friends

Number 1: The best friend who you’re real close to. You see them at least twice a week, maybe more. You talk a lot and catch up on everything.

 Number 2: The best friend you don’t talk to as often, but deep down, you’ll always know that they’re your best friend. They understand you, although they barely see you.


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6 days ago

"Jobs fill your pocket. Adventures fill your soul."

-Jaime Lyn Beatty (via celestinevibes)

(Source: mylittlebookofquotes)


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(Source: frenums)


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6 days ago
menjizen:

Visual Communication first project: combining two contrasting objects together. I made a mini series based on the theme ‘Adulthood vs Childhood’. or maybe I should call it “clash of different intoxicating things ” I love this multi-themed creation.

menjizen:

Visual Communication first project: combining two contrasting objects together. I made a mini series based on the theme ‘Adulthood vs Childhood’. or maybe I should call it “clash of different intoxicating things ” I love this multi-themed creation.


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6 days ago

(Source: patakk)


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6 days ago

1,748 notes | Reblog
6 days ago
me: what are taxes and how do I pay them?
school system: worry not
school system: mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell

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6 days ago
kidwiththelid:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.


Such a simple solution for something that has been so prominent in our country.

kidwiththelid:

slackmistress:

bethanysworld:

fightingforanimals:

Veronika Scott was a fashion student at the College for Creative Studies in Detroit when her teacher, Stephen Schock, challenged her class to create a product that filled a need, rather than satisfying or creating a fad. Veronika’s design was a coat for homeless people that could transform into a sleeping bag, since in her city, she says, “you are constantly faced with the homeless epidemic.” 

Not only did her design win a International Design Excellence Award from the Industrial Designers Society of America, it’s become the core of Veronika’s nonprofit organization, The Empowerment Plan, which hires people from homeless shelters and transition homes to help her make the coats. Now, three years later, the 24-year-old social entrepreneur expects that her team of 15 seamstresses will produce over 6,000 coats in 2014 — all of which will be distributed free of charge to people living on the streets. 

Veronika originally designed the coats seeking input from people at a homeless shelter. After receiving feedback from people who used the prototype over a Detroit winter, she refined the design to create her final version which, in addition to being a waterproof and windproof coat and sleeping bag, also transforms into an over-the-shoulder bag with storage in the arm sockets. 

When she started out, Veronika states,

“Everybody told me that my business was going to fail — not because of who I was giving my product to but because of who I was hiring. They said that these homeless women will never make more than a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — you cannot rely on them for anything. And I know my ladies enjoy proving everybody wrong.” 

And, their impact is growing — according to CNN, which recently honored Veronika as one of their 10 Visionary Women of 2014, “The Empowerment Plan expects to launch a ‘buy one, give one’ program that will make it sustainable beyond the donations and sponsorships that keep it running now. Hunters and backpackers who’ve asked to buy the coat will be able to do so, and the Empowerment Plan will still create coats for homeless people who need them.”

Veronika is also excited to show other clothing producers that local manufacturing is possible: “I think we’re going to show a lot of people: you think it’s outdated to do manufacturing in your neighborhood, but I think it’s something that we have to do in the future, where it’s sustainable, where you invest in people, where they’re not interchangeable parts.”

You can read more about Veronika’s organization on CNN, or watch a short video about her work here.

To learn more about The Empowerment Plan or how you can support their work, visit http://www.empowermentplan.org/

For a wonderful book about women’s great inventions throughout history, check out “Girls Think of Everything” for readers 8 to 13.

For those in the US who would like to support efforts to end homelessness and help the over 600,000 people who experience homelessness on any given night, visit the National Alliance to End Homelessness athttp://www.naeh.org/ or to find a local homeless shelter to support in your area, visit http://www.homelessshelterdirectory.org/

Important in so many ways.

This is amazing and wonderful.

Such a simple solution for something that has been so prominent in our country.

(Source: fightingforanimals)


73,960 notes | Reblog
6 days ago

queensuperwholock:

gingergiggles:

paimon001:

nachosinthetardis:

there are nice americans

there are rude americans

there are nice brits

there are rude brits

there are nice canadians

there’s justin bieber

Every year on Canadian Thanksgiving, we perform a ritual to purge ourselves of our rudeness, Bieber absorbs it all. He was never meant to escape, we are sorry.

He was never meant to escape.

…I’ve only seen this legendary post in screenshots

(Source: tom-marvolo-dildo)


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6 days ago
thelastmellophone:

mischievouslaufeyson:

sktagg23:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because I’m still charged 5% tax on sanitary products because they’re classed as ‘non-essential’ by the government. 

What the motherfuck.

Solve this by bleeding on everything they love.

*AGGRESSIVELY PROJECTILE BLEEDING AT POLITICIANS* ARE YOU FEELING IT NOW, MR. POLITICIAN?

thelastmellophone:

mischievouslaufeyson:

sktagg23:

whoneedsfeminism:

I need feminism because I’m still charged 5% tax on sanitary products because they’re classed as ‘non-essential’ by the government. 

What the motherfuck.

Solve this by bleeding on everything they love.

*AGGRESSIVELY PROJECTILE BLEEDING AT POLITICIANS* ARE YOU FEELING IT NOW, MR. POLITICIAN?


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6 days ago

ninjagiry:

marniethedog:

I love shopping!

why are people reblogging the short vine version when this exists


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6 days ago

(Source: goodgirlshoney)


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6 days ago
misstinyterror:

😂

misstinyterror:

😂

(Source: tastefullyoffensive)


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6 days ago

(Source: glitterweave)


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6 days ago

My Dad's response to his white co-workers making fun of his accent

White Co-Worker: That's not how you say it.
My Dad: But you knew what I meant so why do you have to make a big deal out of it.
White Co-Worker: Aww come on man, it's funny, lighten up will yah Nestor?
My Dad: You know I speak 5 languages, right? How many can you speak?
White Co-Worker: Just English
My Dad: Tell me something. What does a cow say?
White Co-Worker: Moo?
My Dad: That's right, the cows in my country say that too. You know why? They can only speak one language *walks away*
White Co-Worker: *sheds white tears*

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6 days ago
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